What to do in 24 hours in Manila, Philippines

Manila in the Philippines is a sprawling city. It’s so separate and distinctive from one area to the next. And, just spending 24 hours in Manila is enough to still experience the diversity that the city holds.

The traffic is utterly crazy. Cars pull out in front of each other constantly and traffic lights are a suggestion. In this game of friendly on road co-operation – I didn’t see one accident – it can take 45 minutes to get from an adjacent suburb to the next.

No wonder there are hawkers weaving in and out of cars selling everything from bottled water to fishing rods.

Manila skyline, Philippines
Makati Skyline at night. Makati is a city in the Philippines` Metro Manila region and the country`s financial hub. It`s known for the skyscrapers and shopping malls. Depositphotos.com

How to spend 24 hours in Manila

If you only had 24 hours in Manila, I recommend doing the following three things:

1. Eat a buffet dinner

Filipinos love to “eat and talk” at the same time. Buffets let you socialise and, of course, eat as much as you want. At the Lola Maria Restaurant the buffet featured traditional Filipino foods like chicken adobo, deep-fried seaweed, barbecued seafood, smoked tuna belly and DIY halo-halo for dessert. I was intrigued by the seaweed with little “grapes” which were salty and burst in your mouth as you crunched through the leaves.

2. Shop in at least one mega mall

Pace yourself in Manila, shopaholics. There are a lot of shopping centres in Manila like Greenbelt, Rockwell and the infamous Mall of Asia – the biggest mall in the southern hemisphere. If you’re pressed for time and on a tight budget, I’d head over to the department store Landmark for its crazily cheap prices. I picked up a bikini for $15, a headband for $2 and socks for 50c AUD.

Metro Manila is known to host three out of the 10 biggest shopping malls in the world.

Shopping malls may not be an ideal destination for any travellers to the Philippines, but it doesn’t mean that you have to miss it. Aside from shopping of course, here are 5 things that you can do to make your trip to the Philippine mall more interesting.

Go on a gastronomic trip

Philippine shopping malls hosts a number of restaurants – with lots of food variants. You can sample Filipino, Brazilian, Chinese, Japanese, British, Spanish, Ethiopian, Jamaican, Thai, Indonesian, French food  (the list goes on…) from one shopping mall alone. Prices are quite cheap with food choice starting at 100 PHP (1,5€).  

Insider travel tip: If you want to sample some cheaper Filipino snacks, head down to the supermarket  and sample some cheap food that can go as low as 15PHP (0,25€). These stalls can be found usually on SM shopping malls.

Enjoy some local music

Head down to a mall’s activity centre or food court and there’s a good chance that you’ll catch a performance from a local (or sometimes foreign) music band. Watching the performances are free of charge.

Insider travel tip: Performances are usually done in the late afternoon from 4-6PM

Watch the famous Manila sunset

Head down to SM Mall of Asia (the largest mall in the Philippines spanning 4.2 million square feet) and get a table with the view of the coast. On a clear day, it’s one of the best place to catch the sunset and enjoy a good dinner as well.

Do your souvenir shopping

The malls’ department stores & some specialty shops offer great choices for souvenirs – from wardrobes, postcards, shirts, food & liquor. I admit the price can be a bit higher than a local seller but lower than airport sellers, but if you are ever on a rush – the malls are the most reliable place to get them (Malls open usually from 10h00 – 22h00 – Monday to Sundays).

People watching

I admit this is my favourite activity from the list. Going to malls is one of the favourite past-times of Filipinos (instead of going to parks for example). So, malls are a good place to people-watch as you can see facets of people’s everyday activities. Be mindful though that the malls gets very crowded in the afternoon to the night – especially during Fridays, the weekend, and on the 15th or 30th of the month. So if you want a more tranquil people watching, avoid these periods and go in the morning

24 Hours in Manila, Philippines - SM Mall of Asia
SM Mall of Asia – Depositphotos.com

3. Have a night out at The Fort

If your 24 hours in Manila falls over a Saturday night…you’re in a for fun party night!

A Saturday night must start, though not necessarily end, at the Fort in Bonifacio. A hub of nightlife, the area is buzzing with busy restaurants, bars and nightclubs.

Pier One is a themed bar set on the high seas. Wait staff are dressed in sailor outfits, signal them with an ahoy there if you dare and order cocktails. Bar foods like sisig (of the non-mystery meat variety) are a great accompaniment if on the off chance you’re still hungry after a buffet dinner!

Once you’re ready to hit the dance floor head to Encore. Chandeliers hang down over the stairwell as you strut upstairs into the main third floor party area. The DJ pumps out a heady mix of old school RnB and new hits whilst the dancefloor is shoulder-to-shoulder with the trendy 20-something set.

When you’re all danced out, jump into a cab back to your hotel. If the song playing on the radio is “It’s Time To Go Home Now” you know you’ve had a great night.

After spending your 24 hours in Manila, here’s what else to do during your time in the Philippines:


Paid Volunteer Work While Travelling Abroad

Travellers who are abroad for lengthy periods of time think only of how much they are going to spend. 

International volunteers, gap year individuals, career breaks, and students abroad all budget for the length of their stay. Paid volunteer work is available for those looking to earn money abroad.

They plan to spend as little as possible so that to make sure they don’t run out of money. Most of them forget that while they are volunteering abroad, they can also make money. There are various creative ways to make the most of your holiday by making money while at the same time. Although it can be more intimidating looking for a job while you are abroad, there are many creative solutions that are available for you to use.

These money making solutions won’t make you rich but they could help you extend your holiday and give you more opportunities.

Here are some ideas for paid volunteer work

Blogging

Starting a blog is free, and many websites offer you an opportunity to start a blog. There are WordPress blogsBlogger blogs and many others. Starting a blog is not hard, all you need is to blog about something you love. You can write about where you are volunteering, what you are doing and where you have been. The blogs can be just about anything and if they have good quality content and have a large following, you can make good money. 

You can popularize your blog by telling your friends and acquaintances to stop by and read it. You can make money on your blog through running Google Adwords; Infolinks, affiliate marketing and paid advertising. When you blog long enough and consistently (around 2 or 3 times a week), your blog will become more popular and you will have more readers.

With increased readers, it will lead you to get more money from the blog. There are people who earn hundreds of thousands of dollars because they have been doing it for years. As an individual doing it as a hobby, you could earn up to $ 2,000 to $ 3,000 per month. Start blogging now so by the time you are on your holiday you will be earning money while abroad.

Note that blogging takes time and patience.

Paid volunteer work
Blogging can be a good way to earn money abroad

Article writing

Writing articles is like blogging but a bit different. You could write articles about something you also love and know well about. When you have a topic to write about, go to Google or any other search engine and research about your topic. You article could be 500 to 700 words, well researched and presented. 

Writing a good article takes between 30 minutes to an hour. After writing an article you could sell your articles to publishers, and magazines. Publishers are constantly looking for new and fresh content on the net, and they are willing to pay money for the articles.

Most online publishers will pay $ 7 to $ 20 per article. If you are able to write an article per day or two per day during your free time and sell them in a month you will earn $ 500 to $ 1000. The tricky part is selling the articles to online publishers. Once you have a constant market you will make good money.  Writing articles is like blogging – you need patience and consistency to start making good money.

Pictures and videos

While you are abroad you experience and are exposed to new things. You can document your experiences through photos and videos. Many people would love to see your photos about a village in rural Kenya and videos of their homes. There are companies which will even pay you for your videos and photos like for example National Geographic. Apart from taking photos of common land marks and tourist sites, look for unique photos which could tell a story. Travel companies and other organization could pay you a large amount for what is in your camera.

Making money online

There are websites like Hubpages who pay you when you write lens or hubs on the website. The best part of these online ventures you can write about anything and you can start making good money after 6 – 12 months depending on the quality of your work. Once you have made a lens or a hub it will always make money for you until it stops being popular. Go to their website for more information.

Offline methods

You can get paid voluntary work with some volunteer jobs and paid volunteer work abroad. They give you just enough to pay for basic needs.

Some great volunteer organisations include The Volunteers For Prosperity, The Peace Corps and even becoming a UN volunteer. You are able to find paid volunteer work if you research any of these organisations.

You can also apply for white-collar jobs where you don’t need work experience or any qualifications or a work permit. Jobs like working at a book store, working at a mall, waitressing, and as an Aupair.

You can also work as a tour guide. Other good ideas are working on an organic farm (WOOF) whereby you are given a room and food to work on the farm. This kind of job is preferred by those on gap years and it’s also physically intensive.

Read more about how to travel for free (or next to nothing)


Road Trip to Ilocos Norte and Ilocos Sur Escapade in the Philippines

A road trip to Ilocos Norte and Ilocos Sur: Rich in Culture, Traditions and Lifestyle.

Our trip began at Quezon City, one of the cities that make up the Metro Manila.

We decided to travel on our own with our private vehicle and to use information about the places we were planning to visit through the web. We even used Google maps on how to reach our destination and it was actually accurate.

It’s not that hard getting to those provinces since we traveled on main highways, except for some dangerous curves on the mountain road.

Drive Safely!

Next Stop: The City of Vigan

Vigan is the capital of the Province of Ilocos Sur, a World Heritage Site since it is one of the few Hispanic towns left in the Philippines. There are hotels and other accommodations in and around the area; contemporary and traditional restaurants. Of course, go for the traditional! 

So our plan was to look for a good accommodation since we were planning to stay the night in Vigan. The travel time took 8 hours including stops to have a rest and to eat our packed lunch. We left Quezon City at around 6:00 am and arrived to Vigan at around 2:00 pm.

We searched in advanced for good places to stay the night in Vigan and decided to stay in Villa Angela, since it had positive reviews and reasonable rates. Unfortunately it has very few rooms and there were no vacant rooms when we got there. Don’t worry you can make reservations! We just overlooked. 🙁

So we decided to look for other hotels and found Casa Rica Hotel, a boutique hotel not far from Villa Angela. A really good place! You could feel the traditional life style! Surprisingly we were the only guests to check in the hotel, no worries! Was actually fun because we felt like it was our rest house! 🙂 They were very accommodating, informative and included breakfast. Good service and located less than five minutes drive from the Heritage Village.

It is not hard to find the tourist spots in Vigan. Just around the Heritage Village (which is the main attraction) are plazas, old cathedrals, churches, and museums (donation fee: any amount, others costing only from 20 to 50 pesos).

You can walk or ride the kalesa, it will take you to 7 to 8 different places, but you can request not to go to some of them if you have visited already. Of course it will take you more than one hour to make the complete tour since during that time you’ll take pictures inside museums, climb up a bell tower and other stuff. So be ready! 🙂 

We ate at Cafe Leona for dinner, there’s a wide variety of local to modern dishes. Again, LOCAL! 🙂 In the menu are their must try local dishes. We ordered llocos longganisa, Pinakbet Pizza, Chopseuy, and Plain Rice. Good good good! Good service too! Then back to our hotel for a good night sleep. 🙂 

Then we took off to Laoag, Ilocos Norte at around 11:00 am

Vigan to Laoag will take 1 hour and 30 minutes.

Vigan is the capital of the Province of Ilocos Sur
The City of Vigan is a Unesco World Heritage Site in that it is one of the few Hispanic towns left in the Philippines where its structures remained intact, and is well known for its cobblestone streets, and a unique architecture that fuses Philippine and Oriental building designs and construction, with colonial European architecture. Because of this, Vigan City was officially recognised as one of the New7 Wonders Cities of The World.

Laoag, Ilocos Norte

We arrived to Laoag at around 12:30 pm and headed to the Marcos Museum and Mausoleum (Open daily, 9:00 am to 12:00 pm and 1:00 pm to 4:00 pm) We waited for 30 mins for the registration. It’s a place to learn a lot about Ferdinand E. Marcos, president of the Philippines for 20 long years, his power, success, riches and…more riches…..and more riches….and more and more and more…. riches. His embalmed body in the mausoleum looked like a wax replica to us. 

From there we headed to Malacañang of the North and Paoay Lake which took us 30 minutes to arrive (Tuesday – Sunday 9:00 am to 11:30 am and 1:00 pm to 4:30 pm). Also called the Malacanang ti Amianan, was the place where the former President Marcos resided with his whole family, had a golf course and the Paoay Lake at the back of the house where they played water sports. 

Wow! Lifestyle of rich and famous!

Since we were out of time, we decided not to go to La Paz Sand Dunes but we really recommend going check it out! We couldn’t make it to our planned lunch out since we were going to the Bangui Windmills and to the beaches in Pagudpud, where we didn’t know where we would stay the night. The original plan was to eat lunch at Saramsam YlocanoRestaurant or La Preciosa RestaurantTry them out! They are located in the city and are near each other. Very Convenient!

We headed off to Pagudpud, which took us another hour and 30 minutes.

Laoag, Ilocos Norte
Laoag, Ilocos Norte Jeepney is a most popular public transport on Philippines. – Depositphotos.com

Pagudpud, Ilocos Norte  

Before reaching Pagudpud, we went to the Bangui Windmills. You can go down those sharp curves of the mountain roads for a closer look. They are actually gigantic windmills that generate electricity.  It is not hard looking for a Beach Resort or any accommodation in Pagudpud, there are plenty of choices from hotels to lodges.

We decided to stay in Terra Rika Beach Hotel, which is an “okay” hotel. I suggest you try out Hannah’s Beach Resort, which has lot of activities. You will have to drive another 20 kilometers, which is why we decided not to go to since we were tired. 🙂  

ENJOY THE BEACH! Good food everywhere! Very nice people!

Pagudpud, Ilocos Norte
Aerial view of Windmills for electric power production on the coast. Bangui Windmills in Ilocos Norte, Philippines. Ecological landscape: Windmills, sea, mountains. Pagudpud


Diving Spots in the Philippines

The island of the Philippines has some of the best scuba diving sites in the world.

Located in Indo-Pacific’s Coral Triangle with over 7,000 islands, the Philippines is home to pristine coral reef, huge schools of fish and some pretty rare species.

With so many dive spots in the Philippines, it’s hard to choose which one to visit. Which is why we recommend visiting more than one…a Philippines diving holiday is the best way to explore the islands.

No matter which dive spots you choose, make sure to include the Anilao diving spot! Here’s why:

Philippines scuba diving
Philippines scuba diving – Depositphotos.com

The birthplace of Philippines scuba diving: Anilao 

Anilao in Mabini, Batangas is regarded as the birthplace of Philippines scuba diving. Just 2.5 hours drive south of Metro Manila via the smooth SLEX – South Luzon Express Way, it remains the most popular weekend getaway for Manila diving folks to get their fix for compressed air.

Anilao has one of the highest concentration of marine biodiversity in the planet so it has something for everyone. From the beginner divers who have their check-out dive in one of the many beautiful shallow reef, to the advance divers who enjoy drift dives on strong current, to those training to be technical divers, it has deep sites that goes down to 140ft (43m). 

Underwater photographers are a common lot in Anilao. It isn’t rare to find a group of divers each carrying his own transformer like uw camera setup. It is a haven for macro-photographers for wide range of nudibranch species and underwater critters. It will neither disappoint wide angle enthusiasts as Anilao water is teeming with pelagic and beautiful walls and gardens of corals, both hard or soft. 

Some of the most famous (reasonably priced) Anilao dive resorts are:

There are over 20, maybe 30, dive resorts situated beside each other to suit every type of budget. 

How to get to Aniloa

Hop on any bus bound for Batangas and ask to be drop off at Mabini or Bauan. Take a tricycle and be drop off at one of the 20-30 dive resorts scattered around the cliff.

Search for transport options to Batangas below:

Scuba diving in Batangas, Philippines
Scuba diving in Batangas, Philippines

Insider travel tip

For travelers, or new divers with no group yet, log into one of the many dive forums/scuba board online and join planned weekend divers. You can hitch a ride and contribute on gas, and share boat and DM costs.

Beware:

There is NO beach in Anilao. You have a cliff and a reef. You snorkel here or scuba dive. Or catch the spectacular sunset by the resort deck. 

More spots for Philippines scuba diving

Here are a few more great diving spots in the Philippines:

  • Tubbataha Reefs Natural Park
  • Coron Bay, Palawan
  • Dauin, Dumaguete
  • Malapascua, Cebu
  • Moalboal, Cebu
  • Puerto Galera, Mindoro
  • Anda, Bohol

Not into scuba diving? Try helmet diving at Boracay

Boracay is an island of the Philippines located south of Manila and off the northwest tip of Panay Island in the Western Visayas region of the Philippines.

It was orignally home to the Ati tribe and later a couple took over the ownership of the island around 1900 and cultivation and development of the island began.

Currently named the world’s second best beach after Providenciales in the Turks and Caicos Islands, the award winning Boracay Island and its beaches is said to be the Maldives of Asia.

And if you do not have a diving license, you’ll definitely not miss the underwater scene at Boracay, Philippines.

For an average of about 600 to 700 pesos, you can opt for a leisure helmet dive instead and still get to enjoy the beauty and serenity of the underwater world. You can look forward to a casual walk amongst the fishes on the sea bed lead by experienced divers and even take a shot with the beautiful corals and fishes as memento to bring home with you.

Book a helmet diving experience here.

Helmet diving in Boracay, Philippines
Helmet diving in Boracay, Philippines

Aside from helmet diving, you can expect other water activities namely like para-sailing, banana boat, Discovery dives, island hopping and snorkeling trips. In my opinion, one should never miss a visit to Crystal Cove and enjoy an afternoon there.

For more things to do in the Philippines, check out the below posts:


Top Coolest Bars in Barcelona

Barcelona is home to some of the highest rated and coolest bars in the world.

We are talking secret doorways, desserts served with your cocktails, old fashioned unheard of locations, and bars made completely from ice

Whether it be a cocktail, some traditional sangria, a good old beer or purely the entertainment of a spectacular venue, read on to find the best bars in Barcelona.

See also Where to Get the Best Ice Cream in Barcelona and Cheap Tapas Bars in Barcelona

The top 9 coolest bars in Barcelona

Paradiso: ‘The pastrami bar which hides a secret’

Paradiso was ranked 19th in the world’s best 50 bars. The owner, Giacomo Giannotti, and his team spent the good part of a year designing this menu, and speaks for itself.

In Paradiso, you will walk into what appears to be a pastrami bar, in which you can walk through the cabaret entrance which is disguised as a refrigerator, into the incredible dark and mysterious bar. 

The cocktails in Paradiso are presented in the most theatrical way. Ensuring that the presentation is unbeatable, Paradiso is the place to go for an unforgettable experience

Address: Carrer de Rera Palau, 4, 08003 Barcelona

The Antic Theatre: The Palau de la Música’s fun neighbour!

The Antic Theatre can be found next to the Palau de la Música Catalana, it is filled with locals and serves very reasonably priced drinks, serving beers at 2€ and wine at 3€. Although a small and hidden bar in Barcelona, they have a garden area and inside terrace giving you an incredible view of the enormous courtyard.

The perfect location on a hot day, they provide everything from live music, to poetry and theatre

Address: Carrer de Verdaguer i Callís, 12

See also The Best Viewpoints in Barcelona

Creps al Born: Cocktails and a crepe?

Creps al Born provide you with the fascinating combination of the finest alcoholic beverages and cocktails served with delicious French crepes

Creps al Born is a local pick, located in the heart of El Born. They serve everything from classic cocktails to their own signature cocktails, created by professional mixologists, as well as both sweet and savoury pancakes and are renowned for their cheery and friendly staff, and unique and cosy atmosphere. 

Address: Passeig del Born, 12, 08003 Barcelona

Bobby’s Free: You can only enter with the secret password…

Bobby’s Free looks from the outside as your everyday barbershop, when you enter, you won’t see any drinks or bar stools. In Bobby’s Free, you have to provide the ‘barber’s’ secret passport to enter, which changes every month. Don’t worry, this can be found on their Instagram and Facebook

Once in their bar, you’ll see that it has a classic 1920s prohibition vibe, with an outrageous selection of gins and cocktails to try. They are in easy access for all you G&T lovers, you can find them close to both the Passeig de Gràcia and Plaça de Catalunya. 

Address: Carrer de Pau Claris, 85

Bar Mariatchi: The very first clandestine bar in the city!

Located in the backstreets of the Gothic Quarter, Bar Mariatchi was one of the first clandestine bars to open in the entire city. Squatters would occupy buildings which owners could no longer afford to run and transform them into underground drinking dens. 

Today, there’s no chance of finding yourself at the centre of a police raid like in the past! Its tagline is ‘bad parties, worse hangovers’, and it regularly hosts musicians for some live events alongside some tasty drinks.

It’s definitely one of the bars in Barcelona with the most street cred.

Address: Carrer dels Còdols, 14

El Bosc de les Fades: Fancy a fairytale?

El Bosc de les Fades is less of a bar and more of an enchanting forest, making you feel like you just fell into a fairytale. In fact, the name of the bar literally translates to ‘The Forest of the Fairies’. The place is surrounded by leafy trees and mythical creatures, and they serve everything from coffees to delicious mojitos. 

El Bosc de les Fades can be found just a short walk from La Rambla, in the Museu de Cera, Barcelona’s famous wax museum. For a unique and magical experience, el Bosc de las Fades is the place for you. 

Address: Passatge Banca 5, 08002 Barcelona 

See also The Most Unusual Museums in Barcelona

Manchester Bar: Bucket hats at the ready…

If you’ve ever visited Manchester then you can probably guess what this bar entails… bucket hats, parkas at the ready. This place is your go- to for the Mancunian music scene, located in the heart of the Gothic Quarter. 

Manchester Bar is decorated with iconic black and yellow stripes of the Haçienda, an old Mancunian club from the 80s and 90s. 

In this bar, you can enjoy whatever beverage you like, whilst jamming to the likes of The Stone Roses, Joy Division and Happy Mondays. Both tourists and locals love this little hidden gem in Barcelona, and whether it be solely a cheap drink or some Mancunian culture education you’re after, this is the place for you. 

Address: Carrer de Milans 5, 08002 Barcelona

IceBarcelona: Subzero temperatures on the beach in Barcelona?

Barcelona is not the place you would imagine to experience subzero temperatures, but in the IceBarcelona, your surroundings will be maintaining -5ºC (20ºF). You may sit and relax with your cocktail, surrounded by ice sculptures and furniture made with ice. 

A ticket price to this bar includes a warm coat, gloves and a drink, meaning you don’t have to worry about ruining your party outfit. This place is a hit amongst both tourists and locals, and the most unusual part about this bar is that it is actually located on the beach… if you want your heart warming in subzero fun, this is the place for you. 

Address: Passeig Marítim de la Barceloneta 38 A, 08005 Barcelona

Futballárium: Football Fanatics prepare yourselves

Barcelona is nonetheless a football mad city, Futballárium is literally a bar which is entirely dedicated to the sport. They have memorabilia plastered on every wall, making them a football lover’s dream. 

Futballárium is a family- owned business and a relaxed venue in which you can enjoy both delicious food and a wide range of beers, whilst of course watching whatever live football is showing at the time. 

They are situated in Les Corts, just a couple of steps away from FC Barcelona’s Camp Nou stadium (which we recommend visiting), this is not one you want to miss if you’re into football!

Address: Carrer de Benavent 7, 08028 Barcelona 

Futballarium in Barcelona, Spain.
Futballarium in Barcelona, Spain.

These are a just a few of the best bars in Barcelona to try out. The city is teeming with incredible things to do and places to visit, check out some of our other posts below for more places to explore:


A Guide to Teaching English Abroad

Wouldn’t it be nice to travel the world and get paid for it?

It may sound like a pipe dream, but this is the reality of a TEFL teacher’s life. Basically, you get paid for teaching English abroad.

With English being a global language, there is a demand for it in virtually every part of the world. And where there is demand, there are jobs.

English is a tool that will open doors for so many people, providing them with opportunities that they didn’t have access to before, and, as the English teacher, you’re the person facilitating and supporting that process.

Being a TEFL teacher is an exchange: the door to the world is open for you to set off and explore it, and in return you do the same for others by removing the barrier of the English language.

So, how do you get started? Keep on reading to find out!

Here are our tips on teaching English abroad

1.     Figure out a location

First and foremost, you have to narrow down your options. Having the whole world at your disposal can be overwhelming.

The sooner you can pinpoint a general part of the world you’d prefer to get started in, the sooner you can start figuring out what the process is to get set up as an English teacher.

For Europe-based teachers wanting to visit the rest of the continent, this is usually a far simpler process. You can put feelers out for English language assistant programs across Europe, such as with Meddeas, to get started, and then choose whichever you feel is the best fit for you.

Home will always be a short flight away, as will other European countries, giving you the perfect balance of travel and family time during the holidays. 

For those that have their hearts set on travelling further afield, platforms such as Teachaway are a lifeline for TEFL teachers, providing current listings of job openings, requirements, and application deadlines in various schools across the globe.

The process for arranging your work visa and organizing flights is usually done with the support of the schools, and many also offer travel stipends to cover the costs of their teacher’s flights. 

All that’s left for you to do is brush up on the culture to avoid making any cultural faux pas upon arrival.

2.     Do your research about what it takes to teach English abroad

Many schools require TEFL teachers to have a university degree, and teaching English abroad is often appealing to university graduates as an exciting opportunity to gain some life experience.

For that reason, your professors will no doubt know a couple of students either currently working in this field, or who worked in it for a period. Utilize this and ask them to get in touch with those people to see if they’d be willing to answer any of your nagging questions about what to expect.

In the case that you don’t know any TEFL teachers or have no connections to anyone that knows someone you could ask, LinkedIn is a fantastic platform to connect with people in the industry. In the click of a button, you can reach out to various teachers to request their input on your questions or concerns.

For those that aren’t feeling as extroverted, blogs like the ones you can find written by The TEFL Org should cover nearly every query you may have.

3.     Learn the local language of where you’re going to teach

The best way to really delve into another culture is to start learning the local language.

Often TEFL teachers can find themselves in an English-speaking bubble in the work environment. For those that want to broaden their social circles and really feel like a local when travelling, getting to grips with a basic level of the native language can lead to new friendships, as well as make everyday life run a little smoother.

There’s nothing like being able to order something in a restaurant in another language to give you that sense of independence and belonging, simultaneously. 

Not only will learning the language help you feel settled, but it will also give you a new insight into what your students experience and feel when learning English as a foreign language.

You’ll be able to empathize more with the anxiety they may feel when pronouncing, but also better understand the common mistakes your students make due to translating their language into yours when trying to speak. Understanding these errors means you’ll be able to draw comparisons between how certain things in English are expressed differently to their language, ultimately making you more knowledgeable as a TEFL teacher.

4.     Share your experiences of teaching English abroad

Once you’ve become a seasoned teacher, the best way to move on to new adventures in different parts of the world is to talk to other TEFL teachers about where they’ve been and taught.

Straight from the horse’s mouth is where you’ll get the most honest and useful information on the places you should absolutely check out, and more importantly, where not to go.

Your fellow TEFL teachers have no ulterior motives. They’re floating around on their own travels, and you’re helping them as much as they’re helping you to continue doing so in the best and most informed way possible. 

Thinking back to the beginning of your journey where you researched and read other teachers’ blogs, once you’ve gained some of your own experience, there’s no reason not to share your own tips and advice to inspire and help others by starting your own. The industry is constantly evolving, new resources are always being developed, but TEFL teaching has always remained a community of people willing to share ideas and help one another.

You can also share some articles about how to get an experience like volunteering. Go that one step further to keep the cycle of content TEFL teachers scattered across the globe in motion.

You all share the same passion: travelling. 

With the knowledge of these four main steps now under your belt, the last part of the process is to get qualified. Obtaining your TEFL Certification is your ticket to the first of many adventures you’ll have as a TEFL teacher.

The TEFL companies will support you with all the information and resources you need to join the industry, and then the rest is up to you.

Be that a 2-hour flight, or 16 hours, the beauty of teaching English abroad is that you get to decide where in the world it takes you.


Why Merino Wool Clothing is Ideal for Traveling

If you’re a traveller, you need to consider Merino wool clothing. Whether jet setting in cities or hiking outdoors, staying active is simple when wearing merino clothes.

Merino wool clothes are some of the best travel clothes, for all kinds of travelers. They’re great for layering and keep you both warm and cool depending on the climate – amongst many other benefits!

Keep on reading to find out why Merino wool clothing for travel is so helpful for any traveller – plus, where to get some of the best merino wool clothes. 

What is Merino wool

Merino wool is obtained from Merino sheep and is of high quality, with many unique properties. 

Merino clothes are known for their softness, breathability, adaptability, and elasticity. It’s also not scratchy like other wool types. These are just some of the reasons why merino wool clothing for travel is so popular! 

History of Merino wool clothes

We’ve been using Merino wool for centuries, as merino wool sheep were first bred in Spain and eventually moved to Australia in the 18th century. It was later in Australia where sheep farmers improved the wool quality drastically through selective breeding. 

In the fashion world, Merino clothes became popular in the 1920s with Coco Chanel’s first fine wool jersey dress. Today, wool has become more prevalent in fashion and agriculture, and many different types are available. Australia and New Zealand are still major producers of Merino wool globally.

What’s so great about traveling with Merino wool clothing?

Merino wool clothes should be at the top of your packing list because it’s as close to ‘magic’ as you’re going to get. 

Firstly, you can pack fewer clothes if you choose Merino wool travel clothing, as Merino wool is lightweight. The ‘magic’ happens as its fibres change depending on the temperature. When it’s cool, the wool fibres crimp and bend to trap in air, which will insulate you. In warm weather, Merino wool wipes sweat away quickly from your skin, helping you keep cool and dry. 

Secondly, merino wool clothes are known for being wrinkle-resistant and elastic. They’ll look good after many years, as long as you are taking care of them. Merino is also antimicrobial by nature, meaning it’s odour-resistant, so you don’t need to wash them as often as other clothing. 

Thirdly, you should know that merino wool travel clothing can help provides natural UV protection against the sun. Merino wool clothing has an Ultraviolet Protection Rating of around 40+, which is higher than cotton clothing that only has a score of 5. This rating means that Merino wool can block approximately 97% of UV rays from your skin.

Additionally, you should know that Merino wool is a sustainable material. Merino is a natural and environmentally friendly fibre, it’s also biodegradable and will disintegrate into the earth in about 1-5 years.

Finally, if you’re a hiker, you need Merino wool clothing for your next adventure – it’s the ultimate addition to your hiking gear.

Having a solid base layer for your hike is essential to keep your body temperature in balance, which is where Merino wool travel clothing truly shines. Due to its breathable and natural fibres, Merino wool is a recommended base layer as it is odour-resistant, quick-drying and soft. Its lightness pairs well with heavy jackets and overshirts in cold weather, and it works well on its own in warm weather.

Merino wool clothes for travel
Merino wool clothes for travel – Deposit Photos

Where to buy Merino Wool clothing

Some of the top Merino wool clothing brands include: 

Merino Wool t-shirts

Choosing a merino wool t-shirt is an excellent idea because they’re simple yet stylish and will feel silky smooth on your skin. They’re suited for any activity you may encounter on your travels, whether backpacking through the city, going on a business trip or trekking on an adventure. Merino wool clothing for travel is naturally fast drying, too.

Here are a few great Merino wool t-shirts for men and women:

Unbound Merino t-shirt
Unbound Merino t-shirt

Merino Wool travel shirts (button-up)

Merino wool travel shirts are an ideal travel companion. You can dress them up or down for any occasion, whether you’re going hiking or having a fancy dinner out on the town. Their lightweight material won’t take up too much room in your suitcase.

Unbound Merino button shirt
Unbound Merino button shirt

Merino Wool long sleeve t-shirts

Wearing a merino wool t-shirt with long sleeves is perfect for the traveller on the go. They’ll work for any occasion. Long sleeve t-shirts are ideal as a warming base layer for hikes but are also suited for casual wear due to their elasticity and anti-wrinkle properties.

Unbound Merino long sleeve shirt
Unbound Merino long sleeve shirt

Merino Wool hoodies

A merino wool hoodie is a classic outerwear choice. It has enough comfort for daily travels and offers temperature-sensitive fibres that will keep you warm in cold weather. They’re also incredibly soft and will not scratch your skin like other wool types. 

Unbound Merino sweater
Unbound Merino sweater

Merino Wool underwear

Merino wool is naturally moisture-wicking, and this can help it pull away sweat from your body, which could keep you drier than regular cotton underwear. It is antimicrobial, bacteria and odour resistant, so you will feel fresher for longer with merino clothes. 

Unbound Merino boxers
Unbound Merino boxers

Merino Wool socks

Socks are perhaps the most popular merino wool travel clothing. They can protect your feet from a full day of walking on a hike or around a big city as they offer warmth and superior moisture management thanks to the Merino wool fibres. Some merino wool socks brands offer cushioned soles for added support.

Unbound Merino socks
Unbound Merino socks

Merino Wool travel dresses

Merino wool clothing for travel, such as a travel dress, offers superior comfort and quality. Merino wool clothing has excellent stretch thanks to its high elasticity, making merino dresses the ideal choice for any activity, whether travelling or working.

Smartwool travel dress
Smartwool travel dress

Merino Wool leggings

Merino wool leggings are an excellent choice for travelling. They offer unmistakable softness and natural odour control, so you could have a full day’s hike on a mountain and still feel fresh. The elasticity of merino wool clothes makes a difference and acts as a second skin, offering an extensive range of movement. The wool’s thermoregulation helps keep your body feeling cool when working out and warm when the weather is cold. 

MERIWOOL leggings
MERIWOOL leggings

Merino Wool accessories

Merino wool accessories, such as beanies, gloves, buffs and scarves, are a great way to stay toasty. Merino wool clothing has natural thermoregulating properties, meaning you will stay warm in cold weather.

How to care for Merino Wool while traveling

We know that cleaning your clothing is the last thing on your mind while travelling.

The first step to take care of your merino wool clothing is to check your clothing’s labels. Most brands include recommendations for washing, such as suggesting to wash a merino wool t-shirt after every 10-20 wears. Generally, merino clothes can last longer between washes.  

If you have limited access to facilities while travelling, you can hand wash your merino wool clothing in the sink. Turn the clothes inside out and use warm (but not hot) water with a neutral soap, with a pH level of around 7. Do not use fabric softener, as this can negatively impact the moisture-wicking properties of the wool. 

You can leave your merino wool clothing to soak for up to 15 minutes, then rinse and lay it flat to dry to help it keep its shape. You can also hang your clothes, and you should be fine.

The best long-term travel clothes

If you are an avid traveller or simply want more high-quality, sustainable clothing to add to your collection, merino clothes are a perfect match.

Merino wool is renowned for its elasticity, anti-wrinkling, thermoregulating and anti-odour properties, meaning it will look good and stay fresh for longer than other materials. 

Merino wool clothing for travel is also one of the softest wools available and will not scratch or irritate your skin. We highly recommend picking up a few merino basics – your suitcase will thank you on your next trip, as merino is lightweight and won’t take up too much room!

Whether you’re after a versatile merino wool t-shirt or warm merino hoodie, we think you’ll enjoy the luxurious feeling of merino no matter where you’re going. 

Looking for more tips on sustainable travel? Check out these posts:


A Week in Barcelona | 7 Day Itinerary

Barcelona is one of the best city destinations in Europe, that can offer something for every kind of traveller to enjoy. From breathtaking architecture to world-renowned restaurants and miles of sandy beaches, it has everything you could need for a fantastic holiday!

The only issue you face when coming to Barcelona is that there is just so much to choose from, it can be hard to fit it all in. That’s why it’s important to plan your trip wisely, so that you don’t miss out on the best bits. So, here’s our useful guide to spending a week in Barcelona.

Check out our Barcelona 7 day itinerary.

How to spend a week in Barcelona

Day 1: The Old Town

The Ciutat Vella, or Old Town, is one of the most popular parts of the city for visitors. A visit to this area, with its winding narrow roads and old buildings, feels like travelling back in time!

A week in Barcelona - Ciutat Vella
Ciutat Vella

There is a mix of gothic and neo-gothic architecture in the aptly named Gothic Quarter, we recommend visiting the Barcelona Cathedral and the Ancient Synagogue, believed to be one of the oldest in Europe. 

Head across from the Gothic Quarter to the El Born neighbourhood, to see the Santa Maria del Mar Basilica, and to visit one of the many artisan workshops and fashion boutiques selling local goods. 

The Old Town is also home to La Rambla, which is on many visitors to do lists in Barcelona. On this iconic street you can find the La Boqueria Food Market, perfect for a wander round to sample the delicious fresh fruit, tapas, or meats. 

See also The Best Viewpoints in Barcelona.

Day 2: Modernist Barcelona

Barcelona is famed for its Catalan Modernism style of art, championed by architects Antoni Gaudí and Lluís Domenech i Muntaner

We recommend a stroll up the Passeig de Gràcia street, which is lined with designer shops such as Chanel and Prada, but also the breathtaking Casa Batlló and La Pedrera buildings. From here you’ll also stumble across the Quadrat d’or, a square mile brimming with eye-catching modernist mansions. 

See also Unique Things to do in Barcelona.

Casa Batlló (Unsplash)
Casa Batlló (Unsplash)

Day 3: Beach or Park Day

Barcelona has a glorious year-round climate; it would be rude not to get out and enjoy it! The city has nine beaches that stretch over five kilometres, so there’s a selection of sunbathing spots to choose from. Our favourite beach in Barcelona is Nova Icària, which is a peaceful beach with a great range of sports facilities, including volleyball and paddleboarding

If you’re not in the mood for swimming costumes and sand, the Ciutadella Park is where many locals come to relax at weekends. It is a beautiful, green oasis in the heart of the city, with a lake, fountain, palm trees, and much more. 

See also Water Sports in Barcelona.

Ciutadella park, Barcelona (pexels)
Ciutadella park, Barcelona (pexels)

Day 4: Hop on, Hop off Bus

Give your legs a rest and get to see all the sights of the city by hopping on one of Barcelona’s tour buses of the best landmarks. This allows you to discover places that could be harder to get to alone, such as the Olympic Stadium and Museum on Montjuïc, or the Poble Espanyol, which is a model village museum. 

The best stop off of all is the Sagrada Familia, one of the most famous churches in the world. It is famously uncompleted, but still such a breathtaking experience. Getting in during peak season is likely going to be busy and require queueing, but the exterior is free to see!

Book your ticket here.

The Sagrada Familia (pexels) in Barcelona
The Sagrada Familia (pexels)

Day 5: Tapas and drinks

Barcelona is a foodie paradise. It has an enormous selection of tapas bars, fine dining restaurants, and fresh food markets, to whet the tastebuds of any visitor to the city! We recommend a visit to the El Born neighbourhood, which is jam packed with excellent bars and restaurants – try Bona Sort for tapas and Bar Sauvage for a late-night cocktail. 

See also Cheap Tapas Bars in Barcelona.

Tapas, Barcelona (unsplash)
Tapas, Barcelona (unsplash)

If you’re wanting to take some edible souvenirs back for your friends (or yourself!) take a visit to the Santa Caterina Market or the Mercat de la Llibertat in Gràcia. These are the best places to pick up some Spanish specialties, such as jamon serrano, locally made olive oil, or a bottle of vermouth. 

Day 6: Museum visits

For art-lovers, there are few better places than the Catalan capital. Aside from being a piece of living art itself through the city’s architecture, there are also several fascinating art museums to visit too. Take a trip to the Picasso Museum, which showcases some of the legendary artist’s most famous pieces. Another iconic artist hailing from Barcelona, Joan Miró, also has a museum dedicated to him of his works, the Miró Foundation

See also The Most Unusual Museums in Barcelona.

Picasso Museum, Barcelona
Picasso Museum, Barcelona

There are two contemporary art centres worth visiting in Barcelona: the MACBA (contemporary art museum of Barcelona) and the CCCB (centre for contemporary culture). These centres display artwork from modern and emerging artists from Spain and beyond. 

Day 7: Parc Güell and Tibidabo

End your week in Barcelona on a high – quite literally high above the city! To the north of the city, up on the mountains, you can find the fascinating Tibidabo. Visit the beautiful Sacred Heart Church, which can be seen from below all over the city and unleash your inner child at the Tibidabo Amusement Park just next to it. This is the oldest theme park in Spain, and one of the oldest in Europe, being built way back in 1901!

Head down the mountain and end your day at Gaudí’s iconic Park Güell. This whimsical park is jam packed with architecture and colours, and is the perfect spot to watch the sunset over beautiful Barcelona. Book your ticket online.

See also Things to Do in Barcelona: Our Barcelona Activity Guide.

Park Güell, Barcelona
Park Güell, Barcelona

Check out more of our tips for spending a week in Barcelona


ETIAS Guide to Visa-Free Travel in Europe

We’ve all dreamed of glorious European vacations, right? Whether it’s spending a week in Barcelona, visiting Sardinia in Italy or eating our way through Paris – there are many European travel dreams.

Citizens of roughly 60 countries, including the US, who can travel visa-free in Europe will soon need to make an ETIAS application electronically before entering any Schengen country.

It’s not as complicated as it sounds though and merely involves a few extra steps to add to your travel planning routine. We’ve covered everything that you need to know about applying for ETIAS for your upcoming trip to Europe below.

ETIAS application
ETIAS application process for visa-free travel in Europe

What is ETIAS?

ETIAS stands for the European Travel Information and Authorization System and requires non-European Union citizens seeking visa-free travel to any of 26 nations in the Schengen area to register online and gain approval before being allowed to board planes to the region. It is an entirely electronic system that allows entry and keeps track of visitors from countries who do not need a visa to enter the Schengen Zone.

It’s similar to ESTA (United States’ Electronic System for Travel Authorization), which many travelers need to complete to enter the US. ETIAS aims to lower crime and terrorism risks in Europe and to ease border procedures for visitors.

When will ETIAS take effect?

ETIAS was initially scheduled to take effect from January 2021 but is now expected to become operational by the end of 2022, with transitional measures planned for a smooth introduction.

A list of the ETIAS countries

Countries that require an ETIAS to enter include all countries within the Schengen zone.

The Schengen zone encompasses Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden and Switzerland.

Who will need ETIAS?

ETIAS targets citizens of countries who can enter the EU zone visa-free. This includes 62 countries, including the US, Canada, Australia, Brazil, Argentina, Hong Kong, etc. You can check if you require an ETIAS here.

How does the ETIAS system work?

The ETIAS system will be efficient and straightforward to use, ultimately saving time for applicants and processing.

The ETIAS application can be made in three steps:

  1. Complete the online ETIAS application: It takes about 10 minutes to complete and includes biometric information, citizenship, address, contact details, EU country you’re visiting and background and eligibility questions.
  2. Pay the ETIAS fees and submit the form: When you complete the application, you will have to pay the fee and submit it. The system will process your information and approve your application.
  3. Receive the visa waiver by email: In addition to being sent via email, the approved ETIAS visa waiver is linked electronically to the applicant’s passport.

During your application, the system will automatically process your identity, travel documents and answers to background questions against databases (SIS, VIS, EUROPOL DATA, SLTD & TDAWN (Interpol), EURODAC, etc.) and its screening rules and watchlist.

ETIAS are valid for three years or until the end of validity of the passport registered during the application, whichever comes first.

An example: Venezuelans traveling to France

Since Venezuela is part of the European Visa-Exempt Program, travelers must complete an ETIAS application before traveling to Europe.

Once ETIAS becomes mandatory, Venezuelan passport holders will apply for an ETIAS for France (which is within the Schengen zone) before departure. With an approved ETIAS visa waiver, Venezuelan passport holders will be able to spend up to 90 days in France.

Here’s an example of getting an ETIAS for Venezuelans to travel to France:

  • In the online ETIAS for Venezuela to travel to France application, Venezuelans require the following documents:
    • Venezuela passport: this must be valid for at least three months from the date of entry
    • Debit or credit card: this is required to pay the ETIAS for France fees
    • Current email address: the approved visa waiver will be sent to the email inbox
  • While completing the ETIAS online form, you’ll need the below information on hand:
    • Full name as it appears on the passport
    • Contact details including current residential address and email address
    • Passport information such as the number and expiry date
ETIAS application process for visa-free travel in Europe
ETIAS application process for visa-free travel in Europe

How much does ETIAS cost?

It is planned for ETIAS to only cost €7 for each application for adults over 18 years. Travelers under 18 will not have to pay any fees.

Enjoy visa-free travel to Europe

For members of the 60+ countries that don’t require a visa to enter Europe, don’t let the ETIAS application process scare you away. It’s simply a 10-minute online application that is super simple and efficient!


Where to Find the Best Beaches in Cinque Terre, Italy

If you are looking for a relaxing summer destination to visit during a trip to Italy, then you may consider Cinque Terre on the Ligurian Coast in Italy.

Known for its famous clusters of brightly coloured houses by the sea, the beaches in Cinque Terre are worth a visit. 

Cinque Terre beaches are full of coves, smooth rocks, and old stone harbours – which may not seem apt at first glance but are very well-suited for sunbathing and swimming. Other activities you can expect in the area include a national park and various hiking trails set amongst the Mediterranean sea. 

If you are looking for beaches in Cinque Terre that may be off the beaten path but still offer an unforgettable seaside holiday, look no further! There are amazing Cinque Terre beaches in each of the five villages: Vernazza, Corniglia, Manarola, Riomaggiore and Monterosso al Mare. Here are our favourite beaches in Cinque Terre.

See also Best Places to Visit in Northern Italy.

Cinque Terre beaches
Vernazza, Cinque Terre.

The best beaches in Cinque Terre

Vernazza 

Vernazza is well-known for being a famous fishing village and the only natural port of Cinque Terre. This historic town is also known for its olive oil, as the village is surrounded by steep olive groves that produce some of the tastiest olive oil in Italy.

In Vernazza harbour, you will find two Cinque Terre beaches. The first Vernazza beach is a sandy, small beach that offers flat rocks perfect for sunbathing. You can expect to find calm water and local fishing boats here. It’s located along the main street, about 2 minutes from the railway station.

The second Vernazza beach is on the east side of the village and is very stony. However, this is a more private and secluded beach that visitors can find by walking through the cave on the left side of the village main street.

Corniglia

Corniglia is a hamlet located within Vernazza in Cinque Terre, Italy. This ancient Roman village is one of the only places in the Cinque Terre without direct sea access.

If you are looking for a secluded Corniglia beach, look no further than Guvano. This uncrowded beach is located on the hiking trail between Vernazza and Corniglia, so it isn’t strictly in Corniglia.  

Look for the sign that says ‘Spiaggia Libera’ or ‘Public Beach’. Guvano is also known as one of the unofficial nudist beaches in Cinque Terre, so be warned when visiting that you may see some skin – however, it is relatively quiet and peaceful. 

Corniglia in Cinque Terre, Italy
Corniglia in Cinque Terre, Italy

Monterosso 

Monterosso is one of the largest villages that form the Cinque Terre in Italy. Its prosperous hills produce olive oil, lemons and vines like no other.

If you’re looking for Cinque Terre beaches here, you’re in luck because Monterosso has two main beaches to visit.

If you’re looking for a traditional Monterosso beach, go to the long sandy beach in the ‘new’ part of the village called Fegina. You’ll find sand, umbrellas, beach chairs and a promenade full of restaurants, bars and ice cream stores. This Cinque Terre beach is located right in of the train station in Monterosso.

If you prefer to visit the old part of the village, also known as Aurora, you will enjoy the Monterosso beach on the Vernazza trail. It’s a very sandy beach near the boat rental hub and offers both private and public areas. It is a 10-minute walk from the train station, on the left side.

If you’d like to do some extra exploring in Monterosso, you can find old castle ruins, narrow medieval streets and multi-coloured terraced houses in the village.

Join this boat cruise to Riomaggiore and Monterosso

Monterosso beach in Cinque Terre, Italy
Monterosso beach in Cinque Terre, Italy

Riomaggiore

Riomaggiore is the southernmost region of the Cinque Terre in Italy. It is a small village located in the La Spezia province in the Liguria region. This historic village is said to have originated as early as the 8th Century. 

Riomaggiore beach is a public beach just east of the village itself. It offers crystal clear waters, a harbour, a ferry dock and a stony setting. 

You’ll also find many boulders at Riomaggiore beach, but this does not hamper the experience and is very typical of Cinque Terre beaches. 

Riomaggiore is also well known for its Via dell’Amore or ‘Lover’s Lane’, a romantic path that offers incredible views of the Mediterranean coastal landscape. This walk takes around 20 minutes to complete and will lead you to Manarola.

Manarola

Manarola is a small town within Riomaggiore in the north of Italy. It is the second-smallest of the Cinque Terre villages and sits 70 meters above sea level on a high rock. 

While there are no official Manarola beach, you will find a beautiful harbour here that is perfect for deep-water swimming. Manarola is one of the smallest regions in Cinque Terre, so you can expect a lot of privacy when visiting, especially if visiting during the off-peak tourist season.

For those with an adventurous spirit, take the ladder and be rewarded! There is also an outdoor shower available to freshen up. To get here, you’ll need to walk about 3 minutes away from the train station. 

Manarola, Cinque Terre, Italy
Manarola, Cinque Terre, Italy

Alternate Cinque Terre Beaches

If you are in the area and looking for more Cinque Terre beaches, you may consider Levanto beach. Levanto is not one of the main Cinque Terre beaches but is only a 3-minute train ride from Monterosso (book your train tickets here). 

Levanto beach is long and beautiful, blessed with a sandy shore perfect for all kinds of summer activities. It includes both private and public sections and offers many amenities such as a bar, outdoor pool, beach chairs, umbrellas and outdoor showers. 

Additionally, there are many types of water sports equipment that you can rent, such as canoes, peddle boats, surfboards and motorboats. 

Ready to hit the beach in Italy?

No matter which of the Cinque Terre beaches you choose to visit, you’re in for a beautiful vacation! While the beaches in Cinque Terre may err on the rocky side, this doesn’t mean that they can’t fulfil your dream of having a relaxing Mediterranean getaway! 

Remember to consider the Cinque Terre region of Liguria, Italy, when planning your next fantastic holiday. 

Looking for more Italian beaches to explore? Check out these posts:

Where to Stay in Sardinia, Italy

Best Beaches in Sardinia, Italy

Best Places to Visit in the Amalfi Coast in Italy